Monday, February 4, 2013

flowers in the house


My go-to winter flowers from the market-- 
tulips, daffodils or freesias in my favorite pitcher.
Simple and sweet.


I've been looking though my art books at flower paintings, and keep going back to this one--The Flower Market, Tokyo by Robert F. Blum, 1891. (Click for a better look.)

Such an intriguing scene. I think back--where did the flowers come from? forward--where are they going? historically, what was going on in Tokyo at that time? 

And how the loose abundance of flowers contrasts with the formal, meaningful art of Japanese flower arranging that is really all I'm familiar with from that country. Has anyone written a book about flower arranging across the globe?


Flowers on a Windowsill, by John La Farge, 1862;
best known for his stained glass windows, but I love his delicate flower paintings.


Lilac, by Otto Franz Scholderer, (about 1860-1902). 
Such lovely simplicity reminds me of the Manet flowers I posted about here
(in my second post, almost exactly two years ago).

Now brighten up your Monday and jump on over to Jane's
for more Flowers in the House.

26 comments:

  1. Good Morning, I'm here for the party, the coffee and a close up look at those tulips.

    Beautiful painting of lilacs. Makes me long for spring. But we have sunny skies today and the snowdrops are still flowering so today will more than do.

    xo Jane

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  2. Hello Jen:
    What wonderful paintings of flowers and your own tulips too are so very pretty.

    We were most intrigued by what you had to say about Tokyo and the contrast between the informality of the flower market and the very formal, as we view it, Japanese style of flower arrangements. Also, yes, what was going on in Japan at that time?

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    1. I am woefully ignorant of the history of distant continents! There's always something new to learn.

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  3. I love your vase of tulips in that first photo, and how lovely that you included all those beautiful pieces of flower art. I love thinking about the Japanese market and where those flowers would end up.

    {Thanks for visiting my blog too!} :o)

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  4. I love your tulips in the vase Jen,
    they are beautiful and what a lovely shade.
    Flowers always cheer me up
    and remind me that Spring is coming.

    I hope that you have a good week.

    Fiona

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  5. Hi Jen, Although I admire Baroque still-life paintings of flowers with their complex symbolism, right now I am admiring the fresh charm of the flowers you have featured, both your own arrangement and the painted ones.

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    1. I was going to put in pictures of the more classical still life paintings, and how they contrast with the more natural arrangements, but am going to do a separate post on them.

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  6. Oh so pretty - I love real flowers and paintings of flowers - yours are all wonderful.

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  7. Jen,
    your flowers are lovely! I don't know why I never think to get any, they so brighten up a room! I was just at my local grocery store the other day and they had just gotten in the most gorgeous tulips in a varity of colors. Can't wait for spring!
    Rebecca

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  8. Pretty tulips - and I like yout Jug (pitcher). Like The Flower Market painting. You could check this out, re the flower arranging - http://www.save-on-crafts.com/partone.html

    Have a good week! x

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    1. Thanks for the link--I took a peek, and look forward to reading it.

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  9. Hi Jen, I love to have fresh flowers in the house. At the moment its daffodils everywhere! The smell is divine and they are so sunny and pretty.

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    1. Daffs have the best smell! Of course I say that about lilacs too. And freesias. And...

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  10. pretty! Your tulips look great in your black pitcher :)
    I didn´t know John La Farge, I like his painting.

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  11. Oh, spring flowers! Your tulips are so very beautiful. The promise of things to come! And I love your thoughts on the flower market. You're right - I always think of Japanese flower arranging as so very formal too, and this market is a total contrast. xx

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  12. Tulips and lilacs...hmmm are we yearning for Spring? Love the Japanese flower market, there's nothing like an abundance of flowers just overflowing.

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  13. You know I love a black vase! And flower paintings. That first one is a winner!

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  14. Oh Jen, I'm from that country but I'm not sure what was going on in the era...perhaps they bought the flowers for offering or just enjoy themselves? Mobile shop must have been less expensive and very convenient for them.

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  16. Is there any civilization that does not love flowers? That's a serious question.

    I love the La Farge windows in Trinity Church in Boston. When we visited the docent on duty lent us a pair of opera glasses to see them better. His paintings are nice, but he was a master designer of stained glass windows.

    My cats had spring fever today and all three went outside for a bit - the first time since November. Hope yours are well.

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    1. I hope not. That would be terrifying.

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  17. Great painting. Although the whole ikebana thing is very "Japan", I had never pictured a flower market in Tokyo before. And yet there must be one!

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  18. What a nice time to think about flowers. I love the Lilac picture. Now I will dream of spring.

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  19. Hello Jen

    I love "Flowers on the window sill" The mood and values invite questions. Your arrangement is beautiful.
    Helenxx

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  20. maybe it's something you should consider doing, writing a book about flower arranging throughout the world. i'm sure it'd be great!

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